Justice Department claims black and Hispanic voters are dumb and unsophisticated

black voter

For reasons that can only be ascribed to politics (my gosh, I’m getting so tired of prefacing every single thing this bunch of clowns does with the same phrase), Eric Holder and the wannabe-fascists in his Justice Department are carrying out a jihad on behalf of vote theft. They are doing this by contesting Voter ID laws that are being passed in many states despite a nearly unbroken string of defeats in appeals courts.

To make their case that Voter ID laws are discriminatory the Justice Department has testified time and again that black and Hispanic voters are less capable that white voters of obtaining the necessary ID and in understanding the candidates and issues. Via Heritage’s The Daily Signal:

At the preliminary injunction hearing in July, before Judge Thomas D. Schroeder in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina, the government produced Professor Charles Stewart of MIT’s political-science department. According to the transcript of that proceeding, when Stewart was asked why he believed that eliminating same-day registration (which only eleven states have) was discriminatory, he said that same-day registration provides “a mechanism and a time that’s well situated for less sophisticated voters, and therefore, it’s less likely to imagine that these voters would — can figure out or would avail themselves of other forms of registering and voting” (emphasis mine).

And who are those “less sophisticated voters” who can’t “figure out” how to register to vote? They “tend to be African Americans,” according to Stewart. He added that “people who register to vote the closer and closer one gets to Election Day tend to be . . . less-educated voters, tend to be voters who are less attuned to public affairs.” Stewart said that these voters “tend to be African Americans.” Of course, the voter-registration data in North Carolina directly contradicts this, since Stewart was forced to admit that blacks in North Carolina actually “were registered at a higher rate than whites” before Election Day in the 2012 election.

Stewart leveled the same type of criticism at a measure to reduce the number of early-voting days. African Americans would be deterred from voting, he said again, because they are “less sophisticated voters.” He denied that he was racially stereotyping blacks — even when he said that they have a harder time figuring out how “to navigate the rules of the game.” He admitted that he did not survey …read more    

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