Big government is winning campaign issue for Democrats

For some time there has been a garden industry on the left that believed two things held the Democrats from permanent electoral triumph. The first, of course, is that voters are just too stupid to understand what is good for them. This school of thought is championed by a guy named Thomas Frank who wrote a book called What’s the Matter with Kansas? in which he bemoans how stupid people in flyover country… which he had the good fortune to flee… vote against their economic self-interests. A sample:

Not long ago, Kansas would have responded to the current situation by making the bastards pay. This would have been a political certainty, as predictable as what happens when you touch a match to a puddle of gasoline. When business screwed the farmers and the workers – when it implemented monopoly strategies invasive beyond the Populists’ furthest imaginings – when it ripped off shareholders and casually tossed thousands out of work – you could be damned sure about what would follow.

Not these days. Out here the gravity of discontent pulls in only one direction: to the right, to the right, further to the right. Strip today’s Kansans of their job security, and they head out to become registered Republicans. Push them off their land, and next thing you know they’re protesting in front of abortion clinics. Squander their life savings on manicures for the CEO, and there’s a good chance they’ll join the John Birch Society. But ask them about the remedies their ancestors proposed (unions, antitrust, public ownership), and you might as well be referring to the days when knighthood was in flower.

As it turns out, very little was wrong with Kansans economic decisionmaking:

Throughout the 1990s and the first part of this new decade, Kansas had a lower unemployment rate than the U.S. as a whole. In fact, when the country’s unemployment rate dipped below 5% from 1997 to 2001, Kansas’s fell under 4%–alevel so low that economists basically consider it full employment. Overall, the state’s economy added 256,000 new jobs during the 1990s, a 24% growth rate, compared with a 20% national gain in the same period. Even when the economic slowdown set in and the recession finally hit in 2002 and 2003, Kansas lost jobs at a slower rate than the national economy did.

It’s the same story in the state’s …read more    

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